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The Open Adventure Coast 2 Coast Adventure Race in photos

08:36 5th September 2013 By Andrew Cremin
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The 23rd-26th August marked the running of the biannual Coast to Coast Adventure Race. Without being there it’s hard to imagine what kinds of ups and downs four days of kayaking, trail running, mountain biking and even open water swimming can bring about. 

They say that a picture can paint a thousand words and so we thought we’d cobble together a quick slide show of some of the pictorial highlights of the race. Enjoy.

(all photos courtesy of Open Adventure/ James Kirby)

 

The Coast 2 Coast Adventure race is held every two years at the end of August (the next race is due to take place from the 28th-31st August) and follows the concept created by the legendary Alfred Wainwright of creating a continuous route stretching from West to East from the Irish Sea across the backbone of England to The North Sea.

The beauty of the C2C Adventure race is that it’s a stage race and each night competitors get rest and recuperate in tent sites, in preparation for the next day’s racing.

The race route does vary each year but manages to take in highlights of the Lake District, Yorkshire Dales and North Yorkshire Moors on its journey.

Day 1

This year racers started out with a sea kayak to St. Bees Head before jumping onto mountain bikes, a lake kayak, a mountain run before finishing off day one with an open water swim.

Day 2

Began with a road bike stage to pick up kayaks for a paddle across Thirlmere before a run up Helvellyn . The day was then topped off with yet another Lakeland kayak across Ullswater and an open route bike ride to the finish line in Kirkby Stephens.

Day 3

A trail run followed by a long bike stage to the finish in Northallerton.

Day 4

The final day of the 2013 race began with a road cycle then trail run up the formidable Carlton Bank. A mountain bike stage followed before a final trail run into Robin Hoods Bay itself.